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DOPICO X Baloo on self-care, music, and the MYTH of productivity

 

Our founder Elizabeth sat down with musician and future therapist DOPICO to talk about how they’re each managing through quarantine, why self-care shouldn’t be just a trend, how they’ve each defined productivity along their own paths, and what it means to them to be human during this crisis. We also collaborated with DOPICO on a playlist to help bring some of our healing tunes into your own ears.  

DOPICO, also known as Madeleine Dopico, recently released her debut full length album. She stands out as very vocal about mental health, and is simultaneously getting her Master's at Columbia University to become a therapist who can inspire a movement of authenticity and self-discovery in popular culture. Listen to her album on all major listening platforms, and follow her on Spotify and Instagram

 

[Interview starts at 5:08] 

Elizabeth:

We thought it would be fun to do a live together to talk about keeping our sanity (or not), what it looks like right now just to be human and connect, and share that publicly. So, thanks for joining me here.

Madeleine:

Yeah. Thanks for having me. I'm so happy to be connected.

Elizabeth:

And this is my first scheduled Instagram Live ever, so yay!

Madeleine:

I did my first one to promote my album release; I did a little live performance on Instagram Live and I was constantly contacting my friends like, "How do I do this?" I felt like an old person asking a teenager how to do the hip cool thing. So you're not alone, girl.

Elizabeth:

So, tell me just about what it's been like; I think a little bit probably like a roller coaster? But how are you approaching taking care of yourself right now?

Madeleine:

Yeah. So it's a roller coaster definitely I think for everybody, I think that there's so much... There's such a lack of predictability, there's so much uncertainty, none of us know when this will be over. We check our phones, when we get an alert. I know every time I get a notification from Notify NYC, I'm like, "Oh, God, is the world ending or is the world back to normal?" And I sort of fear both. What's crazy is I almost fear going back to what normal means too and I've been thinking a lot about this and in terms of my self-care practices. I'm seeing so many people say... And I talked about this on my Instagram yesterday, people are saying self-care is so important right now. Eating what you need to eat is okay right now, really focusing on music and sitting with your feelings is okay right now. And I'm thinking, "Wait a minute, but right now only? Are you telling me that once the world reopens, we're not supposed to be taking care of ourselves? And we're not supposed to be talking about our mental health and feelings?"

And I think that I have some anxiety around that. And I'm really hoping that this time where we've all been forced to change our habits, we've all been forced to find other ways to connect with each other, feeling isolated, we've all been forced to give up control in a lot of areas where we're used to having habits and control. I'm hoping that that introspective time lasts. I hope that we take these times beyond quarantine.

So, to channel that, my self-care habit is a lot of exercise, a lot of cooking. I love to be creative with what kind of foods I want to make. I don't follow recipes. I just have a ton of groceries and then I say, "Okay, what the hell can I make with this?" It's gotten really creative, I'll put really weird things in a quesadilla.  Pro tip, pretty much anything can go inside a quesadilla.

Elizabeth:

With cheese, yes.

Madeleine:

Oh, yeah. Literally anything. I'm Cuban, so I made ropa vieja, which is this shredded delicious meat. And the number of different meals I made with the leftovers of that, put that in quesadilla, I put that in pasta, I put... So that that creativity, it's like a little sense of agency, and that's something I can control, right? Here are all the moving parts of groceries and creativity and now I have put my hands on this, I have put my mind on this, I've made this my own. Doing that often makes me feel good. And then another practice I've adopted other than just making music and practicing, I have, if you all can see in my hilarious childhood bedroom, my music equipment. So I make music every day and I've been working to promote the album, but I've really found my own routine of working late at night. And I honestly don't go to bed before three or 4:00 am. And your products, I've already thanked you profusely.

I swear to God, I was not sleeping till worse than that, pretty much just not sleeping much with my album release and school finals and papers and Elizabeth sent me the weighted blanket, and the sleep mask and I told her that I was kind of angry at her the other day because I slept till 1:00 pm, I was so comfortable and I truly haven't slept till 1:00 pm since I was a teenager. So, that's pretty hilarious.

Elizabeth:

That's amazing though, when you gave yourself permission to just get as much sleep as you needed.

Madeleine:

Yes, exactly. Permission to get to sleep that I need. So when you asked originally about self-care, permission to find my own individualistic schedule that works for me. And people are saying to me, "Oh, well, you have to get back on a proper schedule. What about your proper schedule?" And I'm like, "But who defines a proper schedule?" I have a life where my music I can do with the hours I need. I'm fortunate enough that my summer classes aren't going to start till 1:00 pm. So who dictates what a proper schedule looks like? And why did it take this pandemic for me to say, "You know what? I actually..." I am more productive in my definition of productive, late at night, when I'm able to detach from my phone, I'm not worried about what anyone else is doing, I'm not worried about the alerts that are going come in, I'm not thinking, where's Alicia? Where's Tara? What are they doing? I'm just focused on me.

I'm really in touch with myself knowing everyone else is asleep. And I just get into this creative, concentrated, focused energy. And I'm not able to get into that in the proper work hours. So why can't my definition of proper be what works for me?

Elizabeth:

Yeah. I have a family member who's got a similar inclination as you, and she struggles with sleep so much because she’s a night owl and that’s what works for her.

But I was listening to a podcast recently talk about the differences of our circadian rhythms and our design and why there's morning people and why there's night people, because if you think that we're living in the savanna, or we're living in the wild, you need some members of your tribe that are naturally awake at night to protect you.

Madeleine:

That makes sense.

Elizabeth:

And then we have other people that sleep during the [night] and who are active in the day, so vice versa.

And so there's a lot of shame, I think that goes in our society around this idea that people who get up early are somehow good and people who sleep late are somehow lazy. But that's not true, if that's how your body's designed, you should work with that.

Madeleine:

Yeah, I agree. And I think those standards of what we associate with lazy, I'm a stickler about productivity can mean a lot of things. Productivity doesn't just have to mean your job and typing like this on a computer, sitting with yourself and your feelings and your thoughts is also extremely productive. And like you said to these associates, you also might be by anyone's definition extremely productive at three in the morning and then sleeping till noon. Right?

Elizabeth:

I think the word lazy is even unnecessary. We don't really even need that word. No one's really lazy. And if you are, maybe you're avoiding something, so you're kind of shut down, but you're not lazy.

Madeleine:

Yeah.

Elizabeth:

It's much more complex than that.

Madeleine:

I agree. Something I talk about all the time in a similar language and structure. And I actually have a song called Too Much TV. So I love television, but I can't stand... If you say to somebody, "Oh, I spent a lazy Sunday... I spent a rainy Sunday watching TV all day." People are like, "Oh, that's so lazy." But if you say, "I was reading books all day." People are like, "Wow, that's so smart. You're so intellectual and amazing." And it's like, wait, but also sitting and watching television if that's what makes you either whatever it is you need to be doing, if you need to be relaxing, tuning out, or maybe you're very actively watching television, maybe it's something that you like to analyze and think about and pick over in your mind and your wheels are turning. Or maybe what you need is for your wheels to chill.

Why is it that we have these biases of what is considered worthy and what is considered a waste of time? And I think that, that comes from external validation and looking out what other people expect of us, rather than what we need, which actually to me is not productive. Right? Like productivity is not doing what actually makes your life better.

Elizabeth:

Yeah, there's so much in that.

Madeleine:

So I still watch TV as self-care.

Elizabeth:

Yes. We had this short conversation the other day when we were talking about productivity, which is something that's been on my mind and it's something I think about a lot, because in running Baloo, there's a vision that I have and there's so much I'm excited to execute on. And so I can at times work really hard with varying degrees of results. And the result usually is a factor of how much energy I really have to give to something, because if you're burning, spinning your wheels, then a lot of times you think you're being productive, but you're not really producing.

So the point I wanted to make was sort of to distinguish between this idea in our culture that we have, of needing to define ourselves through our productivity that somehow if we are productive, we've earned our place, or our right to be here, which I think is such a weight on our collective shoulders. It's how we measure ourselves, measure our self-worth in a way. And it's completely on a different... It's not on the same scale even of relating to life to say that life is not about your productivity, it's about living. And so how do you measure that quality of life that gets left out of this whole discussion?

Madeleine:

Yeah. I completely agree.

Elizabeth:

But that was something that I had a lot of perspective on when I took a sabbatical in 2017. And for the first time separated myself from any job, job title, identity, I had no place. I couldn't say, "Oh, I'm a student backpacking. Oh, I'm on sabbatical, but my real job is this." I had no place to put myself or a label to give myself other than just burnt out person who doesn't know what they're going to do next.

Madeleine:

Yeah. But being a person. Right? At the end of the day that is your identity, right?

Elizabeth:

That's right. And I realized I don't have to do anything to deserve to be here, I deserve to be here because I'm here. And that was beautiful.

Madeleine:

So do you feel like that time without an identity almost then led you to create this company? Because now I would imagine that even if you're not defined by the productivity of your company, it is a big deal, you're a female entrepreneur, you're making a living doing everything that you're doing running a business. So, do you see now that as part of your identity and not having one then led you to define your own or do you think you still detach them?

Elizabeth:

I feel so free because I don't feel at all attached to my identity through the company or through what I do, I feel like I've found a project that I lose myself in and I do it because I love it. And if it didn't work out or I had to change course, it's going to continue to shift and evolve and I'm not attached to what it becomes. I'm actually using it as my personal development. This is the best way to develop myself personally that I've ever discovered, which is trying to run a company and constantly be challenged by my own limitations and having to keep growing and keep getting uncomfortable and keep expanding and facing fears and taking risks. And that's what it's all about for me. And then also, I feel like the whole idea and the vision for the product and the brand that came to me while I was cleared out and had a lot of space and was sitting with myself in Bali, was coming through me, but it's not from me.

I feel that I'm here in service of something greater than me. And I feel like as long as I can stay tuned into that and continue to express from that place with faith that the source of this direction or the source of this message can be trusted, then I can keep moving forward and things will keep going the right way. That's not to say that I will keep growing the business or keep making more money, but whatever happens is what's supposed to be happening for this project called “business.”

Madeleine:

Yeah. I love that. I so relate to that on a lot of levels. I like to think of our main project is ourselves, right? And what do we want for ourselves? What do we want to feel? How do we want to identify ourselves as people? What feelings do we... Do we want happiness? Do we want personal growth? Do we want to feel like we're helping? Do we want to feel like we're connecting? Do we want to feel like we're creating? What are these overarching feelings and experiences and how do we want to grow and evolve with them throughout our lives? And what job might enable us to get there? What structures and constructs might allow us to get to these personal goals and feelings, rather than unfortunately, I feel like a lot of society teaches us, "Go for that job that's shiny and that people respect - and that will make you happy." That well, it's like the opposite direction. You go for the job that's supposed to make you feel personally fulfilled, the job that's supposed to make you seem like you're helping or the job... Or even a relationship, you're supposed to define it in a certain way, such that you feel like you have connections that are deemed worthy. And instead I think it's the opposite. We could all afford to spend more time thinking about what we want to feel first and then think of things and shape the other opportunities that we pursue to help us get there.

Elizabeth:

So what was the process like for you when you were in a good looking safe job? In what industry? 

Madeleine:

Health tech.

Elizabeth:

And then you made the decision that you wanted to give yourself full-time to music?

Madeleine:

Yeah.

Elizabeth:

And it didn't make sense on paper, right? And your community was for it, against it. Probably a lot of opinions?

Madeleine:

Oh, yeah. Definitely. I went to UPenn. And I like to joke that even if you're not in the business school there at Wharton, everyone culturally feels like they're in the business school. And other people could disagree, but my personal experience was that everyone I met wanted to know what flashy internship I was going to have, what bank, at what consulting firm, how much money I was going to make. It felt like such a small boxed in view of what value and self-worth looks like and what status looks like and productivity looks like. And so I felt a lot of pressure. I always had my creative endeavors and my creative pull, but I felt the need to try to get a sexy job. So I got jobs that I thought would impress people and I spent my early 20s at the bars saying, "Yes, I'm a consultant at this trendy, “best place to work in New York” startup." And I realized that I just wasn't even proud of saying that. I was rushing through my days working for... It didn't matter. It didn't matter.

It was so much more important to me to be like, I would rather just say, "Oh, I'm doing nothing." And I wasn't Doing nothing, I was doing freelance, I was doing music, finding ways to support myself. I had to make money. I had to find my own way. But I would rather sit and say to this person at a bar, "Oh yeah, no, I'm lazy and I do nothing. And I don't have a cool job." And I would still be more fulfilled than the opposite. And letting go of my life being about impressing somebody else was really important. And I quit my job without a plan. My mantra just became, "I'll figure it out." I was like, "I'm going to get freelance jobs, I'm going to contact everyone I know who needs work, I have skills." I had to be just very open.

Elizabeth:

Was it an issue at all for you dealing with what other people thought?

Madeleine:

Oh, yeah. It was hard for a while. I went through periods of definitely low self esteem. I went through periods of closing myself off to people I definitely was not as honest or vulnerable with my feelings. I wanted to put on a front of confidence that wasn't there. And that that lack of authenticity made me really secretly unhappy for a while. And it really took... This album is even part of it. Even as to recently, I feel like actually creating the art. Actually, seeing that I could just follow my heart and find new opportunities. I worked as an office manager, which people in my life were like, "You don't even need a college degree to be an office manager." And I'm like, "But this is a part of my path. This is a part of what's working for me." And just tuning that out took a really long time. And it took a lot of just creation and reflection and introspection. It took a lot of silence. Something a bit of a tension, but everyone's so into music and podcasts and whatever. And that's great.

I'm a musician, please listen to my music and please listen to this IGTV. However, I know so many people who never sit in silence, never. Even if they're cooking, even if they're showering, even if they're... Whatever it is, there's always something on. And they don't really sit with their thoughts. And if you ask them, "What do you think about? What do you think about in a day? If you're not thinking about work? If you're not thinking about your friends, if you're not thinking about things that the external world tells you to think about, what do you think about? Well, how does your brain work?" And I'm astonished at how many people are like, "I don't know, because I sit with my podcast." So I think for me, it took a really long time of avoiding the temptation to distract from my thoughts of actually saying, "I do feel insecure, I do feel pressure, I do feel like I'm playing a part to try to please other people. Wow, I'm gross." Not to say that anyone who's doing that is to be ashamed. I'm just talking you through-

Elizabeth:

Yeah, no, it's-

Madeleine:

That was the honesty I had with myself.

Elizabeth:

And once you sit in silence and you realize, okay, maybe you have these things that you think are “cute,” you're like, "Okay, but it's really not that bad. I don't need to avoid it. I can just see it and accept it and love it." And say, "That's there for a reason." That's there to try to protect you from something and allow it and then it usually will just pass. But I like what you're saying, I think that it definitely is a process. And I think that we see people who may have made bold decisions or taking leaps of faith like you and I both have and think, "Oh, well, they made it look like it was pretty easy because look how well things are working out for them." But I think it's the most courageous, terrifying thing that you could ever do to make... It's like you step out of the lane. Everyone is swimming hard in this lane. And to go outside of it feels terrifying.

Madeleine:

Absolutely.

Elizabeth:

And it's boldest things we can do for ourselves as humans, as individuals is, is listen to our heart and do what it tells us to do, especially when there's no one else telling us to do that. And it doesn't feel great right away.

Madeleine:

Yeah, definitely not.

Elizabeth:

I think it's a process. It's a long process of weeks or months of figuring out, "Okay, I made this change, now what? And now what? And now what?" And then you need a little bit of time I think, to get some evidence and experience and you prove to yourself that it was the right thing to do. And I think that there's always this fear that, "I won't be able to prove to myself that it was the right thing to do." But what always happens, is you do prove it to yourself. You just don't know what it's going to look like.

Madeleine:

Trial and error baby. I live and die by trial and error. And the error is just as important. Just is important, the requirement for that.

Elizabeth:

But it's your error. It’s the one that you made, it's not someone else's.

Madeleine:

Hell yeah. Exactly. And I think I said this to you last time, but something that I say to myself too when I feel like my music isn't successful enough or I didn't do as well writing that paper on my therapy exam. The guilt and the self-loathing is so real. It's so easy for us to be angry at ourselves. It's astonishing to me how I think humans naturally... I like to believe I'm an optimist, want to help each other and want to help each other feel better. But then we have to find excuses to allow ourselves to make ourselves feel better. And when I look back at some things that I wish had gone differently, I just say, "If that's who I was in that moment, then that's who I needed to be."

And just saying that to myself over and over, really does let me let go and look at something that I was criticizing or perhaps judging negatively before and make me see it as a positive that's only like we said. That's only going to help me in this project of life. It's part of the project of life and what we deem worthy of being part of that journey, I think, can always shift and expand.

Elizabeth:

There's something sort of exciting about change in general, because it always sort of means you have the option to change course. Maybe you are headed in one direction with the inertia of that movement and we are in a period where there is a lot of change and sometimes we have to choose, especially people who are losing job offers or internship offers or jobs, it can feel like it's the worst thing ever. But there really also can be a lot of exciting freedom that comes from that because you have a new future, you get to create what is it going to be. You don't want to be insensitive to people that have a lot of financial stress and a lot of obligations and pressure. But there is some sort of opportunity here too, I think.

Madeleine:

Yeah. Absolutely. I think... So, I've read a lot about the concept of resilience and I actually have seen that I've had my own misconceptions about resilience and I think a lot of people have, I've seen messaging saying, "Stay resilient girl, you have resilience, we're all resilient." And it's like, "Actually, that's not necessarily true." So, what I've learned about resilience is that it's not innate. You're not just born resilient, maybe she's born with it, maybe it's Madeleine, maybe she's just fabulously resilient because she's amazing. No. Resilience is something that we have to grow. Unfortunately, some people have been forced to because of unjust systems, that's a whole separate rant that I could go on. But there are people who have been forced to build resilience out of injustice and my heart goes out to them. But then for a lot of us, we haven't really faced adversity needed to grow resilience.

And a lot of us, myself I've lived a pretty privileged life and I'm very fortunate for that. And dealing with uncertainty, dealing with losing a job, dealing with change unexpectedly and a lack of control. It is an opportunity, it's an adversity where it's an opportunity to grow resilience, to grow your thought processes and your reactions to your stress, your reactions to your thoughts and the way that you have to cope creates this ability. It's like a snowball to be able to cope further and cope further and cope further down the line. So I do see the silver lining in us all having an opportunity to grow more resilience.

Elizabeth:

Yeah. And it does remind you of what's really important right now, which might not be shopping, it might be making time to be intentional about people you connect with. Because now you're not bumping into each other the way you used to.

Madeleine:

Yeah, absolutely.

Elizabeth:

And coming back to how we started this conversation, which is self-care, our health becomes priority.

Madeleine:

But our health should always be a priority. Right? And that's what I'm really kind of just... I don't know how, I hope that the community of people chime in. I hope that our community of people who believe in wellness and believe in self-care, find a way to really say self-care isn't good right now, self-care is good. Period. Focusing on your health isn't just good right now, focusing on your health is good. Period. And I'm very hopeful that that will be a silver lining to coming out of this pandemic. Yeah, I'm hopeful.

Elizabeth:

Yeah.

Madeleine:

I had a question for you. I've been thinking about this whole time. So, you talked a lot about growing yourself and being introspective and detaching this business from the entire meaning in self-worth of your life, that it flows through you instead. However, you do still have to, I'm sure you have late nights and work really hard running the business. So how do you make time? For me, balancing things, music does that. Music is my time to be introspective and piece my different values and different experiences together. But I'm wondering for you how you're able to make time to just reflect on yourself as a whole, but then also reflect on, "How's my business doing? How's my brand?" How do you balance that?

Elizabeth:

Yeah. As someone who used to spend a lot of time in reflection and journaling and introspection as I was looking for my path, it's been really challenging now, because every waking moment, I have to stop myself from thinking about work. And it's funny because I love work. So I don't want to stop myself from what I love, but at the same time, I have to separate myself from it and give myself permission to have thoughts that don't have anything to do with work that have to do with myself and how am I doing? And how do I feel? And it's been really hard for me sometimes. I think every day is different. We were saying this pandemic period feels like a roller coaster, I also feel like my life feels like a roller coaster all the time because I'm constantly adjusting to trying to manage my energy. My default is to think, I've got to manage my energy so that I can bring my best self for the business.

But what about managing my energy for myself, just for myself? That's where I have a little bit of trouble right now because... And I really enjoyed our conversation the other day about productivity, I know we talked about it briefly and I've thought about it a lot. So there's this thing about balance, where we say everyone's trying to achieve balance, have it all. Okay, so in Eat Pray Love, there's a part where the super hot guy, I forgot his name right now, tells her, "You don't have balance in this day or maybe even in this week, you have balance across your life." So maybe right now I go all in on work because that's what there is for me to do right now. That's the phase of my business. That's what's happening. And this is where I am, I'm building a business. But it's not going to be forever.

So there's this phase and then the next phase might be something else and something else. And over the course of your life you find a balance. So that's something I wonder, it's like, "Maybe it's okay, I can give myself permission to go all in on this project right now, because that's what there is for me to do." But on the other side of the coin I-

Madeleine:

It's a lot.

Elizabeth:

It's a lot.

Madeleine:

Thinking through it though, is definitely the way that you... Definitely the most crucial part is being aware of it and noticing it and naming it.

Elizabeth:

And even knowing that we were going to speak about this topic, I've been paying more attention to what are the things that I do to take care of myself and something as simple as putting on makeup and putting on my favorite jeans and my favorite t-shirt and coming to my desk and feeling pretty, that to me is self-care. And then I just got a Revel membership, which is the mopeds scooters that you can rent around New York City.

Madeleine:

Oh, that's so fun. Badass.

Elizabeth:

They’re so fun! I don't recommend them if you're not comfortable on a moped, because it could be really dangerous. But that was my primary mode of transportation for almost two years when I lived in Asia, so I'm comfortable on one. And so going outside and just taking a 10 minute ride around the neighborhood on the moped, just because it's a beautiful day is the best. So it's really little things that I've tried to add to my day here and there and that's what I’ve got.

Madeleine:

I love that. I love when you were like, "If you're not someone who's comfortable on a moped..." And I'm like, "I don't know that about myself." That's not like... I'm not a self aware enough person to know if I'm comfortable on a moped...

Elizabeth:

Start slow, start slow.

Madeleine:

Yeah, I don't know that about myself, maybe our next Instagram Live I can tell you if I'm comfortable on a moped. But I've been having dance parties outside by myself, I swear to God I look insane. It's so fun. It is such a mood lifter. If anyone on here is from my hometown of Sleepy Hollow, if you just go down at noon to the river, you will see me with my headphones jamming out. And I even find this little practice helpful sometimes when I do see some more walk by, my instinct is like, "Oh, no, stop." And I just try to push myself to be like, "No, I'm not hurting them by continuing to dance it out." And doing that more and more and being like, "I'm doing this for me." It's just so helpful. I feel free, super free. And feeling free at a time that we're quarantined, that's magical. That's magical because we so often don't feel free, we feel trapped, we feel isolated, we feel uncertain. So whatever the hell it is that makes you feel free, that's productive baby. I don't care what it is.

Elizabeth:

I want to say that movement is the best thing ever. I did a yoga class last night, and I got so inspired; so many new thoughts and ideas.  I think we get locked up in our bodies being sedentary, and moving releases ideas that I feel like were stuck in my body, giving them the chance to come up.

Madeleine:

Yeah, I love that. And we have the freedom too, I urge people to experiment right now, like a good thing working from home if you're not used to it, try standing up if you don't usually do a standing desk, try changing every time you change tasks, sit in a different place, stand in a different place. Run around the block if you are fortunate enough to live in a place where you can do that every half hour, just experiment and see what works best for you. What a unique opportunity where experimenting in an office can feel a little bit less realistic. Now is the time to figure out our own superpowers. We're not all the same, we're not all designed the same. The same thing doesn't work for everybody and it's a real opportunity to try and see, learn about ourselves and learn how we thrive best. Because why not? And what's the worst thing that can happen if you just ran around the block and decided that that doesn't work for you. "Okay, that's one more thing I know about myself. I know I'm not a moped person and I know I don't like runs around the block." You know?

Elizabeth:

Yeah.

Madeleine:

But learning about ourselves, knowledge is power.

Elizabeth:

Yeah. And I want to say we're probably not going to be on for too much longer, so if anyone has any questions, pop them in the chat and we can talk to those points.

Madeleine:

This has been so fun. And I've seen so many people scrolling through, I just want to say thanks to everyone on here. And I also need to plug my album because I'm trying to get it out there. I care so deeply about it. And I care so deeply about connecting with other people through music and hopefully lifting spirits during quarantine. So, my album is DOPICO. 

You can find it on Spotify, iTunes, Tidal, anywhere you listen to music, it's there. It's a self-titled album, D-O-P-I-C-O. There are a lot of different energies and emotions, you'll dance your ass off and then eventually you'll cry. Or so I hope. So, feel it out and also, I'm plugging you whether you like it or not, because I am actually truly obsessed with Baloo's products. When I got introduced to Elizabeth, I was like, "Oh, well, she's really cool, but that's gonna be awkward if I don't really like her products and then I have to be fake and pretend I do." I'm truly, truly obsessed and I've never felt better. So do yourselves a favor and also check out Baloo's stuff.

Elizabeth:

Yeah, we have weighted blankets and we have a crystal eye mask. We're the only eye mask out there that has a pocket to hold a crystal over your third eye chakra, which just makes it super fun. So you can choose your crystal and with or without the crystal the eye mask is so comfortable and cozy and I sleep with one every night, but I noticed when I use the purple fluorite stone that I have the most interesting dreams.

Madeleine:

All the sleep masks I've had, they move and they fall off and blah, blah, blah. This one just melts on your face and you completely forget it's there. And it looks cute. I'm not going to be a little shallow, I still want to look cute sometimes when I go to sleep. And it's super cute.

Elizabeth:

Thanks. Yeah. Thanks for saying that.

Madeleine:

Yeah.

Elizabeth:

It was so great to chat with you and connect and see your face.

Madeleine:

Yeah. So great to connect with you and to anyone on here who I don't know, my Instagram's @iamdopico, follow me I'll likely follow you back if you ever want to chat, I'm just super-

Elizabeth:

I love the music, I love the music.

Madeleine:

Oh, thank you.

Elizabeth:

It's so great. Yeah.

Madeleine:

Thank you-

Elizabeth:

I have a favorite song, but I forgot the name of it right now, but it's the dance beat, really fun.

Madeleine:

Take Care of Myself. Probably the self-care song, if I were you.

Elizabeth:

Yeah that one.

Madeleine:

There's a self-care song on the album.

Elizabeth:

Perfect.

Madeleine:

We'll have to make the music video dancing with the eye mask.

Elizabeth:

Yeah.

Madeleine:

Well, thanks so much, Elizabeth. This was so fun.

Elizabeth:

Thank you too. Thanks everyone who joined us and you guys have a great day.

Madeleine:

Have a good one you all. Take care of yourselves.

Elizabeth:

Bye, bye.

Madeleine:

Bye.